Liturgy

200x221-liturgy.jpg SACRAMENT PROGRAM

'Family focused, parish-based, Catholic school-supported'

"Your unique and indispensable role in your child's Catholic Christian formation is one that both school and parish endorse and support. It is your privilege and responsibility, which follows from your commitment when your child was baptised, to present your child for the sacraments."

John XXIII College prepares children for the various sacraments during the course of this year's religious education programs: Year 3 - Reconciliation, Year 4 - Eucharist, Year 6 - Confirmation.

Your family celebrates that sacrament in your home parish, the parish community in which you regularly participate.

Image © Tony Kiely, Emmaus Productions

Some of our local parishes have supplied the following information. Further details on the College website.

Nedlands Parish (Holy Rosary)

FIRST RECONCILIATION
Celebration of Sacrament: Saturday 17 October - 10:000am

CONFIRMATION
Celebration of Sacrament: Saturday 19 September - 6:00pm & Sunday 20 September - 8:45am
Parents' Adult Education Evening: Wednesday 2 September - 7:30-8:30pm (Parish Centre)

Claremont Parish (St Thomas Apostle)

FIRST RECONCILIATION
Celebration of Sacrament: Tuesday 20 & Wednesday 21 October - 3.30-4.30pm

CONFIRMATION
Celebration of Sacrament: Friday 4 September - 6.00pm

Don't see your parish here?
Like further information? Contact: Mary-Anne Lumley, Parish Liaison lumley.mary-anne@johnxxiii.edu.au
Alternatively go to the archdiocesan website:
http://www.perthcatholic.org.au/parishes-priests/index.cfm?loadref=16

'GOOD NEWS' for 20th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

"My flesh is real food and my blood is real drink." (John 6: 51-58)

The following is from Fr Richard Leonard's homily on this Sunday's gospel and is printed here, with his kind permission. Fr Richard Leonard SJ is the author of Preaching to the Converted, Paulist Press, New York, 2006

In the early 1970s there was an edition of Readers Digest that told how a jet crashed in the Andes. It was a good case study in moral reasoning. The issue was that some of the survivors of that crash resorted to cannibalism to survive. The question the author posed was, 'Is it ever ethical to eat another human being?'

Whatever the extreme and specific ethical arguments for cannibalism might be, the thought of eating another person is repulsive to most of us. Yet many people outside Catholicism often think that we are Christian cannibals, feasting on Jesus' flesh and blood.

The best traditions in the Church have always been very careful in the language they use about how Jesus is present in the Eucharist. We are not cannibals. We are not eating Jesus' liver, brain and bones.

liturgy-140815.jpgIn the Catechism when it speaks of the Eucharistic real presence, it never refers to 'Jesus' but always to 'Christ'. The distinction matters. The Eucharist is a Sacrament of Easter. It is the glorified, risen Christ who is wholly and truly present under the form of bread and wine at the Eucharist.

As a Catholic I believe that Christ, raised by God from the dead, is truly and personally present to me in the Eucharist. How - is a question that misses the point of the gift.

Image ©Creative Ministry Resources

Chapter six of John's Gospel is a discourse on the Eucharist. It is also, and at the same time, a discourse about Jesus' passion and death and our mission to follow in his way. For Jesus, the new Moses, not only gives bread to the people, but also in his passion, death and resurrection he gives us himself. This is why the Church has always linked the events at Easter with the celebration of Eucharist.

Why have we been given this unique gift? The Eucharist is not meant to be a feast for a privileged few. It's not a private devotion. It's not meant to be something that only assures us of our own particular salvation. It is meant to be something that empowers all Christians to go out and transform the world with love and goodness for Christ's sake.

The Church has always linked what we do away from the Eucharist with what we celebrate at it. This doesn't mean that all of us can rush out and feed the world's poor. It does mean that most of us can assist other groups or people who do precisely that. And it does means that when we think about who we will vote for as political leaders, we ask about their platform in relation to those in our country and world who are suffering the most. The former General of the Jesuits, Fr Pedro Arrupe once said, 'If there is hunger anywhere in the world, then our celebration of the Eucharist is somehow incomplete everywhere in the world'.

Sometimes we can think of the Eucharist as a magical act. Jesus counters such a notion in today's gospel when he tells us that he gives us himself 'for the life of the world'. The Eucharist does not turn us into cannibals; it's meant to make us radicals, radically committed to all God's people everywhere.

© Richard Leonard SJ.

COMMUNITY MASS

Friday 21 August - Loreto students will help to prepare the celebration of the Mass and families are particularly welcome.
Our College community celebrates the Eucharist each Friday morning in term time. Don't wait to be invited to Friday Mass - everyone is always welcome to this joyous, 'user-friendly' celebration.

If you have any questions, please contact:
Lumley.mary-anne@johnxxiii.edu.au

Where: Chapel
Time: 8:000am - 8:30am
When: Fridays in term time.